//THIS IS THAT BLOG//
since writing on toilet walls is done neither for critical acclaim, nor financial rewards, it is the purest form of art - discuss
//THIS IS THAT BLOG//
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nerdcore:

Google Glass Augmented Privacy-App: http://www.crackajack.de/2014/04/16/google-glass-augmented-privacy-app/
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new-aesthetic:

Placemeter | Making your city better

Imagine never having to guess how busy your favorite restaurant is or waiting in line at the grocery store. Placemeter is making it possible, one sensor at a time. Be smarter about your time—and help your neighbors do the same—by becoming a Meter.

Startup wants to use your old phone taped to your window to track how busy locations are.
Previously posted, without knowing the source of the imagery: video of Placemeter’s algorithmic output.
Video of Placemeter’s pitch at Websummit: “Many of you look at this video and see Times Square. But I have 20 years of computer vision experience, and I see a data mine here.”
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betaknowledge:

Open Structures Water Boiler by Jesse Howard
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thisistheverge:

A kinder, gentler robot is coming Robots still aren’t ready to work beside humans, but perhaps a soft touch is the answer
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emergentfutures:

U.S. Air Force is testing Google Glass & building apps for battlefield use
The positive attributes “are its low power, its low footprint, it sits totally above the eyes, and doesn’t block images or hinder vision,” said 2nd Lt. Anthony Eastin, a behavioral scientist on the BATMAN team testing the glasses.
The BATMAN evaluation group is part of the U.S. Air Force’s 711th Human Performance Wing and is one of the military’s most distinguished research and development groups. It comprises both military and civilian behavioral and technology scientists. The BATMAN acronym stands for Battlefield Air Targeting Man-Aided (K)nowledge.
Full Story: Venture Beat
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fastcompany:

Forget The Penthouse, This Drone Has the Best Views Of NYC
Despite all the hype surrounding drones (rumors that Amazon will be unleashing a drone delivery service among them), “drones are not what they seem to people who haven’t played around with them,” Slavin says. “They’re just remote controlled quadcopters.”
Read more> 
fastcompany:

Forget The Penthouse, This Drone Has the Best Views Of NYC
Despite all the hype surrounding drones (rumors that Amazon will be unleashing a drone delivery service among them), “drones are not what they seem to people who haven’t played around with them,” Slavin says. “They’re just remote controlled quadcopters.”
Read more> 
fastcompany:

Forget The Penthouse, This Drone Has the Best Views Of NYC
Despite all the hype surrounding drones (rumors that Amazon will be unleashing a drone delivery service among them), “drones are not what they seem to people who haven’t played around with them,” Slavin says. “They’re just remote controlled quadcopters.”
Read more> 
fastcompany:

Forget The Penthouse, This Drone Has the Best Views Of NYC
Despite all the hype surrounding drones (rumors that Amazon will be unleashing a drone delivery service among them), “drones are not what they seem to people who haven’t played around with them,” Slavin says. “They’re just remote controlled quadcopters.”
Read more> 
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theatlantic:

Google Wants to Make ‘Science Fiction’ a Reality—And That’s Limiting Their Imagination

The future is vast, and scifi provides but a tiny porthole to see it.
Read more. [Image: Library of Congress]
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futuristech-info:

Nuclear power plants built in the ocean? New design increases safety - Interesting concept
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theatlantic:

When Your Hearing Aid Is an iPhone

The world is loud. As a partial result of this, the typical human aging process involves hearing loss that ranges from mild to severe. And though that loss can be a big problem—”blindness separates people from things,” Helen Keller said, while “deafness separates people from people”—it’s one that has a solution: Get a hearing aid.
It’s a solution that should be both easy and obvious. At this point, hearing aids are relatively advanced; digital technology means that the devices have gotten very good at filtering out background noise, minimizing feedback, and emphasizing human voices in noisy environments. The little machines have become adept, as one audiologist puts it, at making "soft sounds audible, average sounds average, and loud sounds okay to hear." 
The main problem with hearing aids, though, has less to do with technology and more to do with culture: Many people who need the aids don’t want to get them. They associate them with age. They associate them with ailment. They associate them with the ailment that comes with age. As a result, in a society that values youth above almost all else, the people who can benefit most from hearing aids are often the ones least likely to take advantage of them. 
While hearing aid manufacturers have responded to this by designing devices that are as small as possible and custom-fitted to the ear canal, one company has come up with another solution: a hearing aid that is integrated into smartphones. Starkey Hearing Technologies recently launched Halo, a hearing device that syncs with iPhones and iPads. The technology, the company says, doesn’t just amplify hearing; it also allows users to listen to music, sync movies, receive phone calls, and chat over Facetime. It allows for geotagging according to specific places—so, for example, it calibrates itself to the volume of a user’s favorite restaurant or coffee shop. It joins devices across wireless networks. It’s a medical-tech answer, basically, to the broad aspiration of the connected home.
Read more. [Image: TruLink/Starkey Hearing Technologies]
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proofmathisbeautiful:

MIT Whizzes Invent Magical Furniture That Changes Shape on Demand
By Liz Stinson  
04.15.14
Furniture has traditionally been a static thing. We sit at our tables, in our chairs that hold their stiff, rigid shape no matter what we’re doing or how we’re feeling. As our homes become smarter and more personalized, furniture has almost wholly been left out of the revolution.
It’s a shame. Just imagine if your sofa could sense how you’re feeling when you get home from work. To stave off marathon TV sessions, it could transform from a cushioned pile of pillows to a rigid lounge as encouragement to go outside and move around. This exact shape-shifting scenario is an unlikely reality, but a new project from MIT’s Tangible Media Group envisions more realistically what might happen when our furniture is finally able to respond to us.

Called Transform, this table-like structure metamorphoses based on the motions and emotions of the humans around it. Developed by Sean Follmer, Daniel Leithinger and Hiroshi Ishii, the magical device was on show at the Lexus Design Amazing display during Milan Design Week.
The team describes Transform as a table, though you’d have to be hard-pressed to eat dinner at it. The rectangular object is made of 1,152 plastic pins that are controlled by individual microprocessors that sit underneath. A computer program dictates how each pin moves, creating undulating wave motions and pushing pins up to create sandcastle-like structures to tell a sort of tangible narrative. A Kinect above can sense when someone is nearby, and as you run your hand above the pins, they shy away like a school of fish after you dip your hand in the water.
An Evolving Project
If it looks familiar, that’s because the people responsible for Transform are the same people who created the astounding InFORM project. Last fall, when the Tangible Media Group released footage of InFORM, the internet’s head collectively exploded. In the video you watch as a human’s motions on screen are translated into a shape-shifting 3-D display, almost like a computer-assisted pin art toy.
It was truly bonkers, and not just because of how strange it looked. Cooler than the obvious visual appeal was the idea that someday we might actually use something like this to communicate with each other. InFORM was a first glimpse at a world where human-computer interaction has moved beyond flatscreens into the physical realm.
Though Transform moves similarly to InFORM, the projects actually have little in common. InFORM was essentially a way to make a computer interface exist tangibly, so the resulting project still very much looked and acted like a computer might. “Transform is going a little further,” explains Sean Follmer, one of the engineers on the project. “We’re saying, what could it mean to have physical interaction more imbedded in your home and in your life?”
Follmer and Leithinger believe computer-human interaction doesn’t have to look like a computer. In fact, they’re betting in the future technology will be so embedded into our surroundings that we’ll hardly notice it at all. “To me the most terrifying vision would be to be surrounded by touchscreens,” says Leithinger.
Beyond the Touchscreen
As our possessions become smarter and smarter, the question becomes less about if we can interact with these objects and more about how we want to interact with them. Touchscreens will simply be one of the many options–after all, swiping and tapping a flat, glassy screen isn’t a blanket solution to make something interactive.
“Materiality and tactility are fundamental human desires,” says Ishii. In world where we’re increasingly surrounded by flat pixels, Ishii’s lab is on a conquest to figure out how we can avoid a glass-covered future.
Transform is still very much a rough proof of concept, but the potential applications of this tangibility are easy to imagine: A piece of furniture that reacts to our mood or surroundings, a tangible architectural rendering, a new way to visualize topographic data, and that’s only a glimpse of what’s possible.
In the future all of our connected surroundings will have a richness that goes far beyond a flat screen, the team is betting. As Leithinger puts it: “Every little thing I have on me will be reacting to me in the future, and I don’t think only through pixels.”
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2087:

IllumiRoom: Peripheral Projected Illusions for Interactive Experiences

IllumiRoom is a proof-of-concept system from Microsoft Research. It augments the area surrounding a television screen with projected visualizations to enhance the traditional living room entertainment experience.
IllumiRoom uses a Kinect for Windows camera and a projector to blur the lines between on-screen content and the environment we live in allowing us to combine our virtual and physical worlds. For example, the system can change the appearance of the room, induce apparent motion, extend the field of view, and enable entirely new game experiences.
The system uses the appearance and the geometry of the room (captured by Kinect) to adapt the projected visuals in real-time without any need to custom pre-process the graphics.
2087:

IllumiRoom: Peripheral Projected Illusions for Interactive Experiences

IllumiRoom is a proof-of-concept system from Microsoft Research. It augments the area surrounding a television screen with projected visualizations to enhance the traditional living room entertainment experience.
IllumiRoom uses a Kinect for Windows camera and a projector to blur the lines between on-screen content and the environment we live in allowing us to combine our virtual and physical worlds. For example, the system can change the appearance of the room, induce apparent motion, extend the field of view, and enable entirely new game experiences.
The system uses the appearance and the geometry of the room (captured by Kinect) to adapt the projected visuals in real-time without any need to custom pre-process the graphics.
2087:

IllumiRoom: Peripheral Projected Illusions for Interactive Experiences

IllumiRoom is a proof-of-concept system from Microsoft Research. It augments the area surrounding a television screen with projected visualizations to enhance the traditional living room entertainment experience.
IllumiRoom uses a Kinect for Windows camera and a projector to blur the lines between on-screen content and the environment we live in allowing us to combine our virtual and physical worlds. For example, the system can change the appearance of the room, induce apparent motion, extend the field of view, and enable entirely new game experiences.
The system uses the appearance and the geometry of the room (captured by Kinect) to adapt the projected visuals in real-time without any need to custom pre-process the graphics.
2087:

IllumiRoom: Peripheral Projected Illusions for Interactive Experiences

IllumiRoom is a proof-of-concept system from Microsoft Research. It augments the area surrounding a television screen with projected visualizations to enhance the traditional living room entertainment experience.
IllumiRoom uses a Kinect for Windows camera and a projector to blur the lines between on-screen content and the environment we live in allowing us to combine our virtual and physical worlds. For example, the system can change the appearance of the room, induce apparent motion, extend the field of view, and enable entirely new game experiences.
The system uses the appearance and the geometry of the room (captured by Kinect) to adapt the projected visuals in real-time without any need to custom pre-process the graphics.
2087:

IllumiRoom: Peripheral Projected Illusions for Interactive Experiences

IllumiRoom is a proof-of-concept system from Microsoft Research. It augments the area surrounding a television screen with projected visualizations to enhance the traditional living room entertainment experience.
IllumiRoom uses a Kinect for Windows camera and a projector to blur the lines between on-screen content and the environment we live in allowing us to combine our virtual and physical worlds. For example, the system can change the appearance of the room, induce apparent motion, extend the field of view, and enable entirely new game experiences.
The system uses the appearance and the geometry of the room (captured by Kinect) to adapt the projected visuals in real-time without any need to custom pre-process the graphics.
2087:

IllumiRoom: Peripheral Projected Illusions for Interactive Experiences

IllumiRoom is a proof-of-concept system from Microsoft Research. It augments the area surrounding a television screen with projected visualizations to enhance the traditional living room entertainment experience.
IllumiRoom uses a Kinect for Windows camera and a projector to blur the lines between on-screen content and the environment we live in allowing us to combine our virtual and physical worlds. For example, the system can change the appearance of the room, induce apparent motion, extend the field of view, and enable entirely new game experiences.
The system uses the appearance and the geometry of the room (captured by Kinect) to adapt the projected visuals in real-time without any need to custom pre-process the graphics.
2087:

IllumiRoom: Peripheral Projected Illusions for Interactive Experiences

IllumiRoom is a proof-of-concept system from Microsoft Research. It augments the area surrounding a television screen with projected visualizations to enhance the traditional living room entertainment experience.
IllumiRoom uses a Kinect for Windows camera and a projector to blur the lines between on-screen content and the environment we live in allowing us to combine our virtual and physical worlds. For example, the system can change the appearance of the room, induce apparent motion, extend the field of view, and enable entirely new game experiences.
The system uses the appearance and the geometry of the room (captured by Kinect) to adapt the projected visuals in real-time without any need to custom pre-process the graphics.
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2087:

Robohand - Customized, Fitted, Mechanical Fingers and Hands
2087:

Robohand - Customized, Fitted, Mechanical Fingers and Hands
2087:

Robohand - Customized, Fitted, Mechanical Fingers and Hands
2087:

Robohand - Customized, Fitted, Mechanical Fingers and Hands
2087:

Robohand - Customized, Fitted, Mechanical Fingers and Hands
2087:

Robohand - Customized, Fitted, Mechanical Fingers and Hands
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designersofthings:

1 in 3 American Homes Ready for 3D Printer
Move over dot matrix and laser printers, American’s are making room in their home office for 3D Printers. A new report published by Forbes has found that one in three Americans would consider a 3D printer for their home this year, most of these Millennials are those aged between18 and 24. 
The report is from CEL Robox, a 3D printer company who successfully funded its printer back in December 2013 on Kickstarter. The company worked with research agency OnePoll to survey 1,000 U.S. consumers.
The report also detailed what consumers are most interested in doing with their 3D printer. Of those that would buy a printer this year, 65% said they were interested in creating and printing customized items for their home.
The most common reasons for wanting a 3D printer were to print items rather than purchasing them in a store (36%) and to print out items to help fix things around the house (35%). 
But many also wanted to get quite crafty, with one in three people to use 3D printers to create personalized gifts for people including wedding favours.
With the likes of Amazon and Staples selling 3D printers and lower cost options (under $1K) becoming available for sale, its only a matter of time before 3D printers become a common appliance in the everyday home. So starting making room on your desk.  
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prostheticknowledge:

Play House
Sound installation by Alex Allmont uses old LEGO to create a machine to generate electronic music - video embedded below:


Play house is an automata that mechanically computes and performs hooky and hypnotic acid house. Like a generative musical loom, a single drive turns a sequence of LEGO gears, levers and latches that mutate riffs and rhythm patterns. These are played out on analogue drums and synthesisers from the halcyon days of 1980’s dance music while the machine gradually shifts the timbre and space of the sound. In the piece the process of creation is laid bare so one can indulge in picking apart the interactions driving the score, seeing sound as it changes in sculpture, exploring our expectations in music, or simply rocking out to some fruity acid.

[Link]
prostheticknowledge:

Play House
Sound installation by Alex Allmont uses old LEGO to create a machine to generate electronic music - video embedded below:


Play house is an automata that mechanically computes and performs hooky and hypnotic acid house. Like a generative musical loom, a single drive turns a sequence of LEGO gears, levers and latches that mutate riffs and rhythm patterns. These are played out on analogue drums and synthesisers from the halcyon days of 1980’s dance music while the machine gradually shifts the timbre and space of the sound. In the piece the process of creation is laid bare so one can indulge in picking apart the interactions driving the score, seeing sound as it changes in sculpture, exploring our expectations in music, or simply rocking out to some fruity acid.

[Link]
prostheticknowledge:

Play House
Sound installation by Alex Allmont uses old LEGO to create a machine to generate electronic music - video embedded below:


Play house is an automata that mechanically computes and performs hooky and hypnotic acid house. Like a generative musical loom, a single drive turns a sequence of LEGO gears, levers and latches that mutate riffs and rhythm patterns. These are played out on analogue drums and synthesisers from the halcyon days of 1980’s dance music while the machine gradually shifts the timbre and space of the sound. In the piece the process of creation is laid bare so one can indulge in picking apart the interactions driving the score, seeing sound as it changes in sculpture, exploring our expectations in music, or simply rocking out to some fruity acid.

[Link]
prostheticknowledge:

Play House
Sound installation by Alex Allmont uses old LEGO to create a machine to generate electronic music - video embedded below:


Play house is an automata that mechanically computes and performs hooky and hypnotic acid house. Like a generative musical loom, a single drive turns a sequence of LEGO gears, levers and latches that mutate riffs and rhythm patterns. These are played out on analogue drums and synthesisers from the halcyon days of 1980’s dance music while the machine gradually shifts the timbre and space of the sound. In the piece the process of creation is laid bare so one can indulge in picking apart the interactions driving the score, seeing sound as it changes in sculpture, exploring our expectations in music, or simply rocking out to some fruity acid.

[Link]
prostheticknowledge:

Play House
Sound installation by Alex Allmont uses old LEGO to create a machine to generate electronic music - video embedded below:


Play house is an automata that mechanically computes and performs hooky and hypnotic acid house. Like a generative musical loom, a single drive turns a sequence of LEGO gears, levers and latches that mutate riffs and rhythm patterns. These are played out on analogue drums and synthesisers from the halcyon days of 1980’s dance music while the machine gradually shifts the timbre and space of the sound. In the piece the process of creation is laid bare so one can indulge in picking apart the interactions driving the score, seeing sound as it changes in sculpture, exploring our expectations in music, or simply rocking out to some fruity acid.

[Link]
prostheticknowledge:

Play House
Sound installation by Alex Allmont uses old LEGO to create a machine to generate electronic music - video embedded below:


Play house is an automata that mechanically computes and performs hooky and hypnotic acid house. Like a generative musical loom, a single drive turns a sequence of LEGO gears, levers and latches that mutate riffs and rhythm patterns. These are played out on analogue drums and synthesisers from the halcyon days of 1980’s dance music while the machine gradually shifts the timbre and space of the sound. In the piece the process of creation is laid bare so one can indulge in picking apart the interactions driving the score, seeing sound as it changes in sculpture, exploring our expectations in music, or simply rocking out to some fruity acid.

[Link]