//THIS IS THAT BLOG//
since writing on toilet walls is done neither for critical acclaim, nor financial rewards, it is the purest form of art - discuss
//THIS IS THAT BLOG//
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Lambo / © / 5MFU
http://www.inventinginteractive.com/2014/08/31/guardians-of-the-galaxy/
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GRAPHIC SOUND VISUALIZERS - XIV
variable // Flora // data driven art and generative design
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"Everyone designs who devise courses of action aimed at changing existing situations into preferred ones. The intellectual activity that produces material artifacts is no different fundamentally from the one that prescribes remedies for a sick patient or the one that devises a new sales plan for a company or a social welfare policy for a state. Design, so construed, is the core of all professional training; it is the principal mark that distinguishes the professions from the sciences."
Herbert Simon, The Sciences of the Artificial, 1962 (via inthenoosphere)
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brucesterling:


*You should buy this book so that more universities will come up with weird cool projects like this.
http://www.harpercollins.com/9780062204691/hieroglyph
About the Book

Inspired by New York Times bestselling author Neal Stephenson, an anthology of stories, set in the near future, from some of today’s leading writers, thinkers, and visionaries that reignites the iconic and optimistic visions of the golden age of science fiction.
In his 2011 article “Innovation Starvation,” Neal Stephenson argued that we—the society whose earlier scientists and engineers witnessed the airplane, the automobile, nuclear energy, the computer, and space exploration—must reignite our ambitions to think boldly and do Big Stuff. He also advanced the Hieroglyph Theory which illuminates the power of science fiction to inspire the inventive imagination: “Good SF supplies a plausible, fully thought-out picture of an alternate reality in which some sort of compelling innovation has taken place.”
In 2012, Arizona State University established the Center for Science and the Imagination to bring together writers, artists, and creative thinkers with scientists, engineers, and technologists to cultivate and expand on “moon shot ideas” that inspire the imagination and catalyze real-world innovations.
Now comes this remarkable anthology uniting twenty of today’s leading thinkers, writers, and visionaries—among them Cory Doctorow, Gregory Benford, Elizabeth Bear, Bruce Sterling, and Neal Stephenson—to contribute works of “techno-optimism” that challenge us to dream and do Big Stuff. Engaging, mind-bending, provocative, and imaginative, Hieroglyph offers a forward-thinking approach to the intersection of art and technology that has the power to change our world. 
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Robot Ride A Hovercycle by sci-tech
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sosuperawesome:

Handmade wooden clocks by ArtmaStudio
sosuperawesome:

Handmade wooden clocks by ArtmaStudio
sosuperawesome:

Handmade wooden clocks by ArtmaStudio
sosuperawesome:

Handmade wooden clocks by ArtmaStudio
sosuperawesome:

Handmade wooden clocks by ArtmaStudio
sosuperawesome:

Handmade wooden clocks by ArtmaStudio
sosuperawesome:

Handmade wooden clocks by ArtmaStudio
sosuperawesome:

Handmade wooden clocks by ArtmaStudio
sosuperawesome:

Handmade wooden clocks by ArtmaStudio
sosuperawesome:

Handmade wooden clocks by ArtmaStudio
California Senate approves measure banning warrantless drone surveillance
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thatscienceguy:

John Conway first theorized that it would be impossible to create a forever-expanding universe using these rules, which was proven wrong by a team at MIT, creating the “glider gun,” which is featured in the third gif. 
Since then, thanks to computers, people all over the world have added new designs to the database, creating amazingly complex designs.
For example Andrew J. Wade created a design which replicates itself every 34 million generations! Furthermore it is also a spaceship (permanently moving pattern) and not only that, it was also the first spaceship that did not travel purely diagonally or horizontally/vertically! These types of spaceships are now appropriately named Knightships.
The simulation has some interesting properties, for example it has a theoretical maximum speed information can travel. Or simply, light speed - as that is the limit in our own universe. The limit is set to 1 cell per generation - after all how can you create something further than 1 cell away in one generation if you can only effect your immediate neighbours? And yet you can get things like the ‘stargate’ (Love the name, huge SG fan here.) which allows a space ship to travel 11 cells in just 6 generations.
Some smart people have even designed calculators, prime number generators and other incredibly complex patterns.
You can create your own patterns here: http://www.bitstorm.org/gameoflife/
All gifs were made from this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C2vgICfQawE
thatscienceguy:

John Conway first theorized that it would be impossible to create a forever-expanding universe using these rules, which was proven wrong by a team at MIT, creating the “glider gun,” which is featured in the third gif. 
Since then, thanks to computers, people all over the world have added new designs to the database, creating amazingly complex designs.
For example Andrew J. Wade created a design which replicates itself every 34 million generations! Furthermore it is also a spaceship (permanently moving pattern) and not only that, it was also the first spaceship that did not travel purely diagonally or horizontally/vertically! These types of spaceships are now appropriately named Knightships.
The simulation has some interesting properties, for example it has a theoretical maximum speed information can travel. Or simply, light speed - as that is the limit in our own universe. The limit is set to 1 cell per generation - after all how can you create something further than 1 cell away in one generation if you can only effect your immediate neighbours? And yet you can get things like the ‘stargate’ (Love the name, huge SG fan here.) which allows a space ship to travel 11 cells in just 6 generations.
Some smart people have even designed calculators, prime number generators and other incredibly complex patterns.
You can create your own patterns here: http://www.bitstorm.org/gameoflife/
All gifs were made from this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C2vgICfQawE
thatscienceguy:

John Conway first theorized that it would be impossible to create a forever-expanding universe using these rules, which was proven wrong by a team at MIT, creating the “glider gun,” which is featured in the third gif. 
Since then, thanks to computers, people all over the world have added new designs to the database, creating amazingly complex designs.
For example Andrew J. Wade created a design which replicates itself every 34 million generations! Furthermore it is also a spaceship (permanently moving pattern) and not only that, it was also the first spaceship that did not travel purely diagonally or horizontally/vertically! These types of spaceships are now appropriately named Knightships.
The simulation has some interesting properties, for example it has a theoretical maximum speed information can travel. Or simply, light speed - as that is the limit in our own universe. The limit is set to 1 cell per generation - after all how can you create something further than 1 cell away in one generation if you can only effect your immediate neighbours? And yet you can get things like the ‘stargate’ (Love the name, huge SG fan here.) which allows a space ship to travel 11 cells in just 6 generations.
Some smart people have even designed calculators, prime number generators and other incredibly complex patterns.
You can create your own patterns here: http://www.bitstorm.org/gameoflife/
All gifs were made from this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C2vgICfQawE
thatscienceguy:

John Conway first theorized that it would be impossible to create a forever-expanding universe using these rules, which was proven wrong by a team at MIT, creating the “glider gun,” which is featured in the third gif. 
Since then, thanks to computers, people all over the world have added new designs to the database, creating amazingly complex designs.
For example Andrew J. Wade created a design which replicates itself every 34 million generations! Furthermore it is also a spaceship (permanently moving pattern) and not only that, it was also the first spaceship that did not travel purely diagonally or horizontally/vertically! These types of spaceships are now appropriately named Knightships.
The simulation has some interesting properties, for example it has a theoretical maximum speed information can travel. Or simply, light speed - as that is the limit in our own universe. The limit is set to 1 cell per generation - after all how can you create something further than 1 cell away in one generation if you can only effect your immediate neighbours? And yet you can get things like the ‘stargate’ (Love the name, huge SG fan here.) which allows a space ship to travel 11 cells in just 6 generations.
Some smart people have even designed calculators, prime number generators and other incredibly complex patterns.
You can create your own patterns here: http://www.bitstorm.org/gameoflife/
All gifs were made from this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C2vgICfQawE
thatscienceguy:

John Conway first theorized that it would be impossible to create a forever-expanding universe using these rules, which was proven wrong by a team at MIT, creating the “glider gun,” which is featured in the third gif. 
Since then, thanks to computers, people all over the world have added new designs to the database, creating amazingly complex designs.
For example Andrew J. Wade created a design which replicates itself every 34 million generations! Furthermore it is also a spaceship (permanently moving pattern) and not only that, it was also the first spaceship that did not travel purely diagonally or horizontally/vertically! These types of spaceships are now appropriately named Knightships.
The simulation has some interesting properties, for example it has a theoretical maximum speed information can travel. Or simply, light speed - as that is the limit in our own universe. The limit is set to 1 cell per generation - after all how can you create something further than 1 cell away in one generation if you can only effect your immediate neighbours? And yet you can get things like the ‘stargate’ (Love the name, huge SG fan here.) which allows a space ship to travel 11 cells in just 6 generations.
Some smart people have even designed calculators, prime number generators and other incredibly complex patterns.
You can create your own patterns here: http://www.bitstorm.org/gameoflife/
All gifs were made from this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C2vgICfQawE
thatscienceguy:

John Conway first theorized that it would be impossible to create a forever-expanding universe using these rules, which was proven wrong by a team at MIT, creating the “glider gun,” which is featured in the third gif. 
Since then, thanks to computers, people all over the world have added new designs to the database, creating amazingly complex designs.
For example Andrew J. Wade created a design which replicates itself every 34 million generations! Furthermore it is also a spaceship (permanently moving pattern) and not only that, it was also the first spaceship that did not travel purely diagonally or horizontally/vertically! These types of spaceships are now appropriately named Knightships.
The simulation has some interesting properties, for example it has a theoretical maximum speed information can travel. Or simply, light speed - as that is the limit in our own universe. The limit is set to 1 cell per generation - after all how can you create something further than 1 cell away in one generation if you can only effect your immediate neighbours? And yet you can get things like the ‘stargate’ (Love the name, huge SG fan here.) which allows a space ship to travel 11 cells in just 6 generations.
Some smart people have even designed calculators, prime number generators and other incredibly complex patterns.
You can create your own patterns here: http://www.bitstorm.org/gameoflife/
All gifs were made from this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C2vgICfQawE
thatscienceguy:

John Conway first theorized that it would be impossible to create a forever-expanding universe using these rules, which was proven wrong by a team at MIT, creating the “glider gun,” which is featured in the third gif. 
Since then, thanks to computers, people all over the world have added new designs to the database, creating amazingly complex designs.
For example Andrew J. Wade created a design which replicates itself every 34 million generations! Furthermore it is also a spaceship (permanently moving pattern) and not only that, it was also the first spaceship that did not travel purely diagonally or horizontally/vertically! These types of spaceships are now appropriately named Knightships.
The simulation has some interesting properties, for example it has a theoretical maximum speed information can travel. Or simply, light speed - as that is the limit in our own universe. The limit is set to 1 cell per generation - after all how can you create something further than 1 cell away in one generation if you can only effect your immediate neighbours? And yet you can get things like the ‘stargate’ (Love the name, huge SG fan here.) which allows a space ship to travel 11 cells in just 6 generations.
Some smart people have even designed calculators, prime number generators and other incredibly complex patterns.
You can create your own patterns here: http://www.bitstorm.org/gameoflife/
All gifs were made from this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C2vgICfQawE
thatscienceguy:

John Conway first theorized that it would be impossible to create a forever-expanding universe using these rules, which was proven wrong by a team at MIT, creating the “glider gun,” which is featured in the third gif. 
Since then, thanks to computers, people all over the world have added new designs to the database, creating amazingly complex designs.
For example Andrew J. Wade created a design which replicates itself every 34 million generations! Furthermore it is also a spaceship (permanently moving pattern) and not only that, it was also the first spaceship that did not travel purely diagonally or horizontally/vertically! These types of spaceships are now appropriately named Knightships.
The simulation has some interesting properties, for example it has a theoretical maximum speed information can travel. Or simply, light speed - as that is the limit in our own universe. The limit is set to 1 cell per generation - after all how can you create something further than 1 cell away in one generation if you can only effect your immediate neighbours? And yet you can get things like the ‘stargate’ (Love the name, huge SG fan here.) which allows a space ship to travel 11 cells in just 6 generations.
Some smart people have even designed calculators, prime number generators and other incredibly complex patterns.
You can create your own patterns here: http://www.bitstorm.org/gameoflife/
All gifs were made from this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C2vgICfQawE
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thatscienceguy:

drunktrophywife:

I don’t like this

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thatscienceguy:

drunktrophywife:

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thatscienceguy:

drunktrophywife:

I don’t like this

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thatscienceguy:

drunktrophywife:

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thatscienceguy:

drunktrophywife:

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thatscienceguy:

drunktrophywife:

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thatscienceguy:

drunktrophywife:

I don’t like this

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thatscienceguy:

drunktrophywife:

I don’t like this

GUYS! Its available on Amazon!!
thatscienceguy:

drunktrophywife:

I don’t like this

GUYS! Its available on Amazon!!
thatscienceguy:

drunktrophywife:

I don’t like this

GUYS! Its available on Amazon!!
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brucesterling:

What works on the battlegrounds of Ukraine
brucesterling:

What works on the battlegrounds of Ukraine
brucesterling:

What works on the battlegrounds of Ukraine